Fireside Ghost Stories



I’m supposed to write to you about telling ghost stories around the campfire, but the truth is this writer is a big ‘ol scaredy cat and just researching good ghost stories is enough to have the hair on the back of my neck stand up! Why do we like telling ghost stories? Do we like to be scared or do we prefer to do the scaring and see someone else’s reaction? Is it the thrill of the story? The adrenaline rush when your brain is thinking is this a fight or flight situation? I mean, we know it’s not real and can’t possibly be true, but…….why is this so scary then?

I’ve been around firepits where some of the funniest moments that ever happened was when someone got super scared. You know the scared I mean, when they are all tensed up, on high alert, and usually make some really strange and high pitched shrieking sounds. Next thing you know, they are tripping over themselves and acting a fool running back toward the safety of the cabin in a frantic wail! (That may or may not be a rather personal experience, but I’ll let you be the judge of that!)

A dear friend is an amazing storyteller that puts on the Georgia Mountain Storytelling Festival and participates in Appalachian Story nights at the Haunts & Harvest at Blue Ridge Community Theater. So, I reached out to her to find out if there are any legends or lore in these Blue Ridge mountains that would be fit for a ghost story tale. She shared this super creepy Cherokee Tail that happened right here in these mountains that you may be interested in. But fair warning, if you don’t like to be scared or don’t want to be super creeped out try these lighter ghost stories and don’t scroll below to read the Cherokee Legend of Spear-Finger!

Ok. I lied. There is no such thing as “lighter” ghost stories. Even the kid’s ones are totally creepy! Why can’t we just stick to roasting marshmallows and singing “Kumbaya” around the campfire?! Ok. I’m pulling myself together. Here we go. I remember hearing this one as a kid. Maybe this was the beginning of my trauma. Courtesy of Café Mom, enjoy “The Pink Jelly Bean”.

Premise: At the end of a long, dark road is a long, dark path. At the end of the long, dark path is a lone, dark house. And the lone, dark house has a single, dark door. Behind the single, dark door is a long, dark hall. At the end of the long, dark hall are some tall, dark stairs. (Story continues, narrowing in from a room to a closet to a chest to a box, etc.) And in the small, dark box is … a pink jellybean!!!!

Notes for telling: The idea here is to build as much suspense as possible before you leap forward and dramatically shout the jellybean line. You’ll know you did it right if your audience reacts by instantly pooping their pants.

Here are a few more:

The Broom Town Curse

Dem Bones

The Ball Pit

Creak

WiFi Connection

As promised, here’s one to make you shiver:

A Cherokee Legend – SpearFinger

Long, long ago there dwelt in the mountains a terrible ogress, a woman monster, whose food was human livers. She could take on any shape or appearance to suit her purpose, but in her right form she looked very much like an old woman.

But not an ordinary woman: her whole body was covered with a skin as hard as a rock that no weapon could wound or penetrate, and that on her right hand she had a long, stony forefinger of bone, like an awl or spearhead, with which she stabbed everyone to whom she could get near enough.

On account of this fact she was called U `tlun’ta “Spear-finger,” and on account of her stony skin she was sometimes called Nun’yunu’I, “Sone-dress.” There was another stone-clothed monster that killed people, but that is a different story.

Spear-finger had such powers over stone that she could easily lift and carry immense rocks, and could cement them together by merely striking one against another. To get over the rough country more easily she undertook to build a great rock bridge through the air from Nunyu’tlu `gun’yi, the “Tree rock,” on Hiwassee, over to Sanigila’gi (Whiteside mountain), on the Blue Ridge, and had it well started from the top of the “Tree rock” when the lightning struck it and scattered the fragments along the whole ridge, where the pieces can still be seen by those who go there. She used to range all over the mountains about the heads of the streams and in the dark passes of Nantahala, always hungry looking for victims. Her favorite haunt on the Tennessee side was about the gap on the trail where Chilhowie mountain comes down to the river.

Sometimes an old woman would approach along the rail where the children were picking strawberries or playing near the village, and would say to them coaxingly, “Come, my grandchildren, come to your granny and let granny dress your hair.”

When some little girl ran up and laid her head in the old woman’s lap to be petted and combed the old witch would gently run her fingers through the child’s hair until it went to sleep, when she would stab the little one through the heart or back of the neck with the long awl finger, which she had kept hidden under her robe. Then she would take out the liver and eat it.

She would enter a house by taking the appearance of one of the family who happened to have gone out for a short time, and would watch her chance to stab someone with her long finger and take out his liver.

She could stab him without being noticed, and often the victim did not even know it himself at the time – for it left no wound and caused no pain – but went on about his own affairs, until all at once he felt weak and began gradually to pine away, and was always sure to die, because Spear-finger had taken his liver.

When the Cherokee went out in the fall, according to their custom, to burn the leaves off from the mountains in order to get the chestnuts on the ground, they were never safe, for the old witch was always on the lookout, and as soon as she saw the smoke rise she knew there were Indians there and sneaked up to try to surprise one alone.

So as well as they could they tried to keep together, and were very cautious of allowing any stranger to approach the camp. But if one went down to the spring for a drink they never knew but it might be the liver eater that came back and sat with them.

Sometimes she took her proper form, and once or twice, when far out from the settlements, a solitary hunter had seen an old woman, with a queer-looking hand, going through the woods singing low to herself:

Uwe’la na’tsiku’. Su’ sa’ sai’.

Liver, I eat it. Su’ sa’ sai’.

It was rather pretty song, but it chilled his blood, for he knew it was the liver eater, and he hurried away, silently, before she might see him.  

At last a great council was held to devise some means to get rid of U `tlun’ta before she should destroy everybody. The people came from all around, and after much talk it was decided that the best way would be to trap her in a pitfall where all the warriors could attack her at once.

So they dug a deep pitfall across the trail and covered it over with earth and grass as if the ground had never been disturbed. Then they kindled a large fire of brush near the trail and hid themselves in the laurels, because they knew she would come as soon as she saw the smoke.

Sure enough they soon saw an old woman coming along the trail. She looked like an old woman whom they knew well in the village, and although several of the wiser men wanted to shoot at her, the other interfered, because they did not want to hurt one of their own people. The old woman came slowly along the trail, with one hand under her blanket, until she stepped upon the pitfall and tumbled through the brush top into the deep hole below.

Then, at once, she showed her true nature, and instead of the feeble old woman there was the terrible U`tlun’ta with her stony skin, and her sharp awl finger reaching out in every direction for someone to stab.

The hunters rushed out from the thicket and surrounded the pit, but shoot as true and as often as they could, their arrows struck the stony mail of the witch only to be broken and fall useless at her feet, while she taunted them and tried to climb out of the pit to get at them. They kept out of her way, but were only wasting their arrows when a small bird, Utsu’ gi, the titmouse, perched on a tree overhead and began to sing “un, un, un.”

They thought it was saying u’nahu’, heart, meaning that they should aim at the heart of the stone witch. They directed their arrows where the heart should be, but the arrows only glanced off with the flint heads broken.

Then they caught the Utsu’ 1gi and cut off its tongue, so that ever since its tongue is short and everybody knows it is a liar. When the hunters let go it flew straight up into the sky until it was out of sight and never came back again. The titmouse that we know now is only an image of the other.

They kept up the fight without result until another bird, little Tsikilili, the chickadee, flew down from a tree and alighted upon the witch’s right hand. The warriors took this as a sign that they must aim there, and they were right, for her heart was on the inside of her hand, which she kept doubled into a fist, this same awl hand with which she had stabbed so many people.

Now she was frightened in earnest, and began to rush furiously at them with her long awl finger and to jump about in the pit to dodge the arrows, until at last a lucky arrow struck just where the awl joined her wrist and she fell down dead.

Ever since the tsikilili is know as a truth teller, and when a man is away on a journey, if this bird comes and perches near the house and chirps its song, his friends know he will soon be safe home.

Ready…Set…Float!



It’s time to kick back and relax river-style! Tubing and kayaking are two activities that need to be at the top of your “Mountain Fun Bucket List”. While on the water, you can enjoy the stunning scenery and let the flowing waterways of North Georgia work their magic! Kayaking requires some arm strength and a bit of determination, but there are definite moments of downtime. Tubing on the other hand involves a whole bunch of sitting and relaxing! If you’re looking for an adventure that makes you feel at ease and involves kicking your feet up, tubing is the type of trip for you.

These activities are enjoyed by all ages and allow you to see an entirely new side of the Blue Ridge nature. You may experience a rush of excitement navigating through low-class rapids, but that’s what helps you move along! Whether you’re on a kayak paddling with an oar or using your palms to guide your tube, a day on the waters is never wasted! The businesses listed below attribute to why Blue Ridge continues to have visitors explore the great outdoors year after year!

Toccoa Valley Campground

11481 Aska Rd, Blue Ridge, GA 30513 | (706) 838-4317 | Hours: Monday-Friday 10am-5pm, Saturday 10am-6pm

Photo Courtesy of Toccoa Valley Campground

Located only a few miles from downtown Blue Ridge, the Toccoa Valley Campground has everything you could need for an outing in the mountains. Tubing, kayaking, and rafting are all available. Their water route takes you on a private 6-mile stretch of the Toccoa River. It has been one of North Georgia’s most popular attractions for over 50 years!

Shallowford Bridge Tube Rental

70 Shallowford Bridge Rd. Blue Ridge, GA 30513 | (706) 632- 2462 | Hours: Monday, Thursday & Friday 11am-5pm, Saturday & Sunday 10am-6pm

Photo Courtesy of Shallowford Bridge Tube Rental

This tubing trip will take you through parts of the beautiful Toccoa River in less than an hour and a half. Shallowford Bridge Tube Rental is one of the oldest, family-owned companies for tubing in the Aska Adventure Area. Visitors are launched into the river at Sandy Bottoms and are sent off on their breezy cruise. At the end of your adventure, you’ll get an up-close view of the historic steel truss Shallowford Bridge!

Blue Ridge Mountain Kayaking

56 North River Rd. Morganton, GA 30560 | (706) 258-2411 | Hours: Monday-Sunday 9am-6pm

Photo Courtesy of Blue Ridge Mountain Kayaking

You can choose your journey while at Blue Ridge Mountain Kayaking! This kayak-only business is located just 2 miles away from downtown Blue Ridge. They offer 2 thrilling expeditions on the Toccoa River including a 6-mile and 12-mile trip. The 6-mile kayak trip takes travelers an estimated 2 hours to complete and the 12-mile trip takes an estimated 4 hours to complete. While kayaking, adventurers can enjoy fishing, swimming, and breathtaking sights of mountains along the route!

Toccoa Wilderness Tubing

8436 B Aska Rd. Blue Ridge, GA 30513 | (706) 455-6496 | Hours: Monday-Sunday 10am-3pm

Photo Courtesy of Toccoa Wilderness Company

All you have to do is bring your crew and the fun will follow! The Toccoa Wilderness Company makes river tubing easy and enjoyable. With a shuttle to the Sandy Bottoms launch area, your toes will be in the water in a matter of minutes. Sit back and let the water carry you away! The 2-mile float finishes its course at the Shallowford Bridge.

Lakewood Landing Boat Launch

Boat Ramp Rd 30560, Morganton, GA 30560

Photo Courtesy of Lake Blue Ridge Civic Association

If you are already a lucky owner of a kayak or a boat, then this is the spot for you! This boat launch is located on the north side of Lake Blue Ridge. You can spend the day as you please on the 3,000+ acres of the lake. The lake offers unbeatable views of the surrounding Blue Ridge Mountains.

Jon Ron Toccoa River Outfitters

15 Black Ankle Creek Rd. Cherry Log, GA 30522 | (706) 838-0200 | Hours: Monday-Saturday 10am-5pm, Sunday 10am-2pm

Photo Courtesy of Jon Ron Toccoa River Outfitters

At Jon Ron Toccoa River Outfitters, there are plenty of options for you to hit the water! There are half-day and full-day solo or guided kayak trips that take you through the upper Toccoa River. They also have trips that can shuttle guests to kayak or canoe at Lake Blue Ridge. If you’re a beginner or pro, Jon Ron Toccoa River Outfitters can satisfy your need to explore the great outdoors!

Toccoa River Tubing Company

340 Toccoa Ave. McCaysville, GA 30555 | (706) 492-5280 | Call for Seasonal Hours

Photo Courtesy of Toccoa River Tubing Company

Grab your family and get ready to go! The Toccoa River Tubing Company, located on the border of Georgia and Tennessee, offers a variety of canoeing, kayaking, and tubing trips. Tubing at this spot of the Toccoa River involves a 1.5-mile and 3-mile float. If you are looking to kayak, there are 1.5-mile and 6-mile trips available. With small rapids, clean water, and picturesque scenery, this is an activity that you’ll have to experience for yourself!

Blue Ridge Halloween



When it comes to Halloween the first thing that comes to mind is all the miniature ghosts and goblins running around seeking out candy by the truckload. Halloween doesn’t have to be just for the little ones, there are a lot of fun things for adults to enjoy. So, channel your inner child, get out your best costume, and prepare to be spooked in Blue Ridge!

Adult Only!

Have you heard about Old Man Jones? Legend has is that Old Man Jones owned most of the section of Blue Ridge where the Fairgrounds now reside. In the late 1800’s Mr. Jones suffered more personal tragedy than many realized. In keeping with the fashion of the day, these “happenings” were not public knowledge and were never published in local papers.  Come see the history for yourself or are you too scared? If you dare to purchase tickets, Click Here.

Shadow Ape Returns to The Blue Coyote Bar and Grill on Friday, October 26th from 8pm-11pm. Put on your best costume for the and enjoy the Halloween Costume Bash while jamming out to Classic rock, 90’s alternative and Southern rock. On Saturday, October 27th The Bone Daddys will have you tearing up the dance floor.  Maddie invites everyone to come out for a Spooktacular good time! Let her know Escape To Blue Ridge sent you.

The Boat Dock Bar and Grill at the Lake Blue Ridge Marina is hosting a Bon Voyage Costume Party on Saturday, October 27th. Oh and hey, hey it’s the Georgia/Florida game! Enjoy food and drink specials all day and the party heats up around sunset!

A Halloween Costume Party and Live Music will be going down at the Copperhill Brewery this Saturday, October 27th from 6pm-10pm. You know why you need to go? Because they have your favorite Ichabod Pumpkin Pie Ale on tap!

Family Friendly

The Blue Ridge Scenic Railway is hosting a Harvest Festival on Saturday, October 27th from 11am-3pm. Enjoy games for all ages, live music by The Whistle Stop Band, interactive displays, delicious carnival snacks, face painting, prizes, costumed characters, and plenty of photo opportunities!

Fall-O-Ween Fest at Mercier Orchards features tractor rides, pumpkin decorating, face painting, carnival games, a movie in the orchard at dusk and more on Saturday, October 27th from 12pm-7pm.

Have little ones to take trick or treating? Ellijay, Blairsville, Blue Ridge, and Copperhill all have safe trick or treating options in their downtown areas. Ellijay has festivities beginning at 5pm and continuing until 8pm.  Trick or treat around the Square in Blairsville from 6pm-8pm. In Blue Ridge, the Halloween Safe Zone begins at 5:30pm. Trick or Treat the merchants in the twin cities of McCaysville, GA and Copperhill, TN. on from 5pm until 7pm.